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Browse Prior Art Database

Surface Modification of Magnetic Disks to Avoid Stiction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040716D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bandara, U: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The described process eliminates stiction caused by coating defects known as windrows. Stiction is the adhesion occurring between the magnetic head and the lubricated particulate disk surface. This adhesion must be low to protect the file from damage upon start-up which is followed by a period of inactivity. Stiction is due, for example, to windrows 1 which are caused by the alignment of magnetic particles in rows. The windrows form a wavy surface (shown on the left in Fig. 2) with spaces between the rows being filled with lubricant. Such a structure enables lubricant to migrate to the head disk interface, leading to stiction.

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Surface Modification of Magnetic Disks to Avoid Stiction

The described process eliminates stiction caused by coating defects known as windrows. Stiction is the adhesion occurring between the magnetic head and the lubricated particulate disk surface. This adhesion must be low to protect the file from damage upon start-up which is followed by a period of inactivity. Stiction is due, for example, to windrows 1 which are caused by the alignment of magnetic particles in rows. The windrows form a wavy surface (shown on the left in Fig. 2) with spaces between the rows being filled with lubricant. Such a structure enables lubricant to migrate to the head disk interface, leading to stiction. To avoid stiction, disk 8 with partially cured coating 2, containing windrows 1, is coated a second time such that the spaces between the windrows are filled with coating material, without changing the initial overall coating thickness. Filling is done by forcing a solvent low- magnetic ink 3 into spaces 4 with a coater 5. Coater 5 is shown schematically in Fig. 1 and comprises a coating roller 7. The encircled part 6 is shown enlarged but not to scale in Fig. 2. Upon completion of filling, disk 8 is cured and polished. The surface profile thus modified suppresses not only stiction but also magnetic defects caused by the large uncoated regions between the windrows.

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