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Identification of Parts and Part Orientation for Automatic Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040719D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Squillace, ZD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described whereby assemblies comprised of similar appearing, but physically different, parts can, on an assembly line, be determined to have the correct part content and the correct part orientation. The method is aimed at automatic assembly with no manual intervention and eliminates secondary parts, such as labels which are costly to apply. (Image Omitted) Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, an assembly (in this case a logic cage) comprised of two halves is equipped with integrally cast or molded rectangular notches opposing one another on each of the respective halves in the assembly. Similar appearing, but physically different, cage halves (that assemble to make different logic cages) are likewise equipped with notches which are, however, located in different positions (refer to Fig. 3).

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Identification of Parts and Part Orientation for Automatic Assembly

A method is described whereby assemblies comprised of similar appearing, but physically different, parts can, on an assembly line, be determined to have the correct part content and the correct part orientation. The method is aimed at automatic assembly with no manual intervention and eliminates secondary parts, such as labels which are costly to apply.

(Image Omitted)

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, an assembly (in this case a logic cage) comprised of two halves is equipped with integrally cast or molded rectangular notches opposing one another on each of the respective halves in the assembly. Similar appearing, but physically different, cage halves (that assemble to make different logic cages) are likewise equipped with notches which are, however, located in different positions (refer to Fig. 3). By placing a light source on one side of the cage and a sensor array comprised of pairs of optical sensors on the other side of the age, the following conditions can be detected automatically (refer to Fig. 4): 1. Condition of the workstation (one or two complete horizontal

rows of sensors activated indicates one or both parts in the

assembly not present).

(Image Omitted)

2. Identification of the assembly being built (indicated by a

vertical pair of sensors activated -- the particular pair

indicating which assembly part number is in the workstation). 3. Correctness of the parts being used (use of wrong or...