Browse Prior Art Database

System Mouse Circuit Interface for Personal Computers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040770D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Linehan, D: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a mouse, as used in the cursor manipulation of personal computers (PCs), has its interface circuitry incorporated within the mouse. It is designed so that the mouse circuitry can send information to and receive information from the host computer enabling it to be easily programmable and modified when adapted to individual software applications. The concept is an improvement over prior designs, which required a special circuit card to be installed in the host PC when operating a mouse. The circuit, as shown in Fig. 1, illustrates how the prior art required a special circuit interface card 10 to be installed within the host PC. Typically, from nine to twenty-five wires were used to connect mouse 11 to the host.

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System Mouse Circuit Interface for Personal Computers

A technique is described whereby a mouse, as used in the cursor manipulation of personal computers (PCs), has its interface circuitry incorporated within the mouse. It is designed so that the mouse circuitry can send information to and receive information from the host computer enabling it to be easily programmable and modified when adapted to individual software applications. The concept is an improvement over prior designs, which required a special circuit card to be installed in the host PC when operating a mouse. The circuit, as shown in Fig. 1, illustrates how the prior art required a special circuit interface card 10 to be installed within the host PC. Typically, from nine to twenty-five wires were used to connect mouse 11 to the host. Although driver software circuitry 12 was programmable, it was slow and inefficient and could only be programmable from its output.

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By incorporating the interface circuitry as part of the mouse and using existing hardware available in the host, as shown in Fig. 2, the need for a special individual card to be installed in the host PC is eliminated. This also frees up serial or parallel ports used by many mice to interface to modems, printers and other available peripherals. The design requires only four wires to connect mouse 11 to the host PC. Programmability is now available at both the output of driver software circuit 12 and the output of mouse 11. The c...