Browse Prior Art Database

Centrifugal Plating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040776D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Braitmayer, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In electroplating baths, the problem of deposition defects in the form of increased roughness (nodules) or (pin)holes is examined by a plating apparatus arranged within a centrifuge. This plating apparatus makes visible with unprecedented precision how the plating quality is affected by such defects. In addition to a plurality of laboratory applications, the described plating apparatus is suitable for online bath characterization of, say, Cu pyro baths. In a laboratory centrifuge 1, two separate electrolytic plating cells 2, 3 are operated and contacted by slip rings 4, 5 connected to operating voltage V. Cathodes 6, 7 are respectively positioned at the inner and the outer end of the cells.

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Centrifugal Plating

In electroplating baths, the problem of deposition defects in the form of increased roughness (nodules) or (pin)holes is examined by a plating apparatus arranged within a centrifuge. This plating apparatus makes visible with unprecedented precision how the plating quality is affected by such defects. In addition to a plurality of laboratory applications, the described plating apparatus is suitable for online bath characterization of, say, Cu pyro baths. In a laboratory centrifuge 1, two separate electrolytic plating cells 2, 3 are operated and contacted by slip rings 4, 5 connected to operating voltage V. Cathodes 6, 7 are respectively positioned at the inner and the outer end of the cells. During the operation of centrifuge 1, heavy particles 8 collect on the surface of outer cathode 6 and light particles 9 on inner cathode 7. During plating, defects in the form of nodules and pinholes are made visible at an unprecedented rate at the outer cathode 6 and the inner cathode 7, respectively. Figs. 2 and 3 show the surfaces of the inner and the outer cathode with pinholes and nodules, respectively, on an enlarged scale. By repeated centrifugal plating of the same sample, surface defects are reduced. Previously undetectable plating bath contamination is readily recorded and controlled by this method.

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