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Selective Metal Deposition or Etching

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040803D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Romankiw, LT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Metal surfaces can be plated or etched by selectively irradiating the metal to a suitable temperature in the presence of an organometallic compound that decomposes at that temperature to either locally plate or etch the irradiated metal.

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Selective Metal Deposition or Etching

Metal surfaces can be plated or etched by selectively irradiating the metal to a suitable temperature in the presence of an organometallic compound that decomposes at that temperature to either locally plate or etch the irradiated metal.

A relatively volatile organometallic metal that readily turns to vapor under suitable pressure and temperature is flowed over metal surfaces in an oxygen- free atmosphere that are selectively locally heated by x-ray, electron beam, RF, infrared, visible light or induction. The irradiated metal heats faster locally, and produces corresponding local decomposition of the vapor into a metal and organic or inorganic radical gas with the metal plating onto only the heated area. The activation temperature, plating rate and deposition thickness of the irradiated area are controlled by regulating the vapor flow rate. Suitable compounds for plating are aluminum ethylene, tungsten hexafluoride, titanium chloride and copper organometallics, and these can be alloyed. Pressures vary between that used for chemical vapor deposition and that of sonic vacuum processes.

Metal etching can also be accomplished by using reactive organometallics such as hydrofluoric acid, hydrochloric acid or sulphur hexafluorine.

Disclosed anonymously

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