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Hydrogen Sputtering Treatment for Polyimide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040819D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bartha, JW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Dry processing is used for manufacturing of multilayered structures for packaging and device applications. One of the key elements in dry processing is ion beam sputtering. Using an Argon ion beam of about lkeV, interconnect patterns, e.g. via and stud openings, can be etched into a polyimide layer to form part of a multilayered structure. One of the problems in such a process is the formation of a semiconducting surface layer caused by residual carbon accumulation during the decomposition of polyimide. This carbon layer provides a semi-conducting path for current leakage between isolated interconnections and should be eliminated.

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Hydrogen Sputtering Treatment for Polyimide

Dry processing is used for manufacturing of multilayered structures for packaging and device applications. One of the key elements in dry processing is ion beam sputtering. Using an Argon ion beam of about lkeV, interconnect patterns, e.g. via and stud openings, can be etched into a polyimide layer to form part of a multilayered structure. One of the problems in such a process is the formation of a semiconducting surface layer caused by residual carbon accumulation during the decomposition of polyimide. This carbon layer provides a semi-conducting path for current leakage between isolated interconnections and should be eliminated.

To eliminate this carbon conducting layer, hydrogen sputtering at a low energy of about 200-400 eV is used. Carbon is preferably removed from the surface relative to oxygen and nitrogen, resulting in a polyimide surface even less conducting than the original polyimide. This causes the surface peak shift to be recovered quickly to the original position. The effectiveness of this hydrogen treatment appears to be due to the formation of volatile hydrocarbon complexes which can be easily removed from the surface.

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