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Forming Fine Copper Lines by Dry Reaction and Wet Development

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040985D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haring, RA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A process for forming copper wirings on various surfaces comprises layering a film of copper on a substrate. A layer of photoresist is patterned on top of the copper film, exposing the sample to chlorine gas or a plasma (RF or microwave) containing chlorine ammonium radicals, washing the exposed sample with ammonium hydroxide, and stripping the photoresist. The provided dry reaction-wet development process provides well defined fine lines as compared to wet etching processes.

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Forming Fine Copper Lines by Dry Reaction and Wet Development

A process for forming copper wirings on various surfaces comprises layering a film of copper on a substrate. A layer of photoresist is patterned on top of the copper film, exposing the sample to chlorine gas or a plasma (RF or microwave) containing chlorine ammonium radicals, washing the exposed sample with ammonium hydroxide, and stripping the photoresist. The provided dry reaction- wet development process provides well defined fine lines as compared to wet etching processes.

According to the process for forming copper wiring, a layer of photoresist is patterned on top of a copper film. A wide variety of resists may be used as the copper film is to be etched in a dry reaction process. The copper film with the photoresist thereon is then exposed in a dry reaction process to chlorine gas or a plasma (RF or microwave) containing chlorine radicals. Where the copper is exposed, and only where it is exposed, copper chloride is formed. The copper chloride reaction product then is dissolved away with an ammonium hydroxide solution leaving a fine copper wire with the photoresist thereon. The photoresist is stripped. If desired, the photoresist may be removed prior to the washing of the reacted sample with ammonium hydroxide. The described process is completely compatible with the dry etching of other metals which may be layered with copper as part of the wiring structure.

This process achieves an etch result t...