Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Conversion of Fonts to Letter Quality

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040992D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Malcolm, JW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described for automatically converting existing fo to letter-quality mode without using additional memory. Normally, additional memory is necessary for the storage of more detailed font patterns because normal printer fonts do not have enough dots defined to print a letter-quality draft. In order to print in letter-quality mode, each font pattern would require four times the number of bytes to define all of the necessary dots to achieve acceptable resolution.

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Automatic Conversion of Fonts to Letter Quality

A method is described for automatically converting existing fo to letter-quality mode without using additional memory. Normally, additional memory is necessary for the storage of more detailed font patterns because normal printer fonts do not have enough dots defined to print a letter-quality draft. In order to print in letter-quality mode, each font pattern would require four times the number of bytes to define all of the necessary dots to achieve acceptable resolution.

An excellent solution to the problem of improving the resolution is to use an algorithm to calculate the additional dots required to convert an existing font character into letter quality mode as it is printed. A line-smoothing and line-filling algorithm provides the best approach. The line smoothing algorith performs a least squares fit and the line filling algorithm uses interpolation to calculate the additional dots. The speed of dot matrix printers is such that the additional time for calculation of the points is not noticeable.

The advantages to this approach include no user intervention to substitute different fonts for letter-quality prints and no additional memory necessary to provide higher resolution fonts.

Disclosed anonymously

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