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Automatic Selection of Styles for Double-Width Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000040993D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Malcolm, JW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described for automatically selecting the optimum print style without user intervention. Some fonts are "sparse- dot" fonts. "Sparse-dots" means that there are no consecutive horizontal dots. This enables faster printing because of the reduction of data being printed. Another type of font is the "dense-dot" font. These fonts support more intricate patterns, such as Old English. When converting fonts for double-width (5 pitch) sparse fonts must be emphasized before expanding. This emphasizing fills the gaps that would otherwise be obvious deformities in the printout. It is necessary to detect whether "dense" or "sparse" fonts are being printed in order to determine whether to emphasize or not. "Dense" fonts do not require filling. In fact, "dense" fonts look smeared if they are emphasiz before expansion.

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Automatic Selection of Styles for Double-Width Printing

A method is described for automatically selecting the optimum print style without user intervention. Some fonts are "sparse- dot" fonts. "Sparse-dots" means that there are no consecutive horizontal dots. This enables faster printing because of the reduction of data being printed. Another type of font is the "dense-dot" font. These fonts support more intricate patterns, such as Old English. When converting fonts for double-width (5 pitch) sparse fonts must be emphasized before expanding. This emphasizing fills the gaps that would otherwise be obvious deformities in the printout. It is necessary to detect whether "dense" or "sparse" fonts are being printed in order to determine whether to emphasize or not. "Dense" fonts do not require filling. In fact, "dense" fonts look smeared if they are emphasiz before expansion.

By checking two characters in the font before printing, it is possible to detect side-by-side dots and classify the font as "dense" or "sparse". This allows filling of only the "sparse" fonts before printing and the optimum appearance for the double- width printing is obtained automatically.

Disclosed anonymously

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