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Multiple Duplicate Stations in Series Provide Backup When Automated Multiple Identical Operations Must be Performed

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041011D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barenboim, M: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

In an automated assembly line consisting of an in line series of single function work-stations, the failure of one work-station stops the entire operation. It is expensive to provide duplicate, normally idle, parallel backup stations. The present embodiment shows however, that when each unit in production requires repetitive identical operations, or when a number of units, each requiring an identical operation, are handled in a group as a unit, an in line series of duplicate work-stations provides an economic work-sharing system with inherent backup capability.

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Multiple Duplicate Stations in Series Provide Backup When Automated Multiple Identical Operations Must be Performed

In an automated assembly line consisting of an in line series of single function work-stations, the failure of one work-station stops the entire operation. It is expensive to provide duplicate, normally idle, parallel backup stations. The present embodiment shows however, that when each unit in production requires repetitive identical operations, or when a number of units, each requiring an identical operation, are handled in a group as a unit, an in line series of duplicate work-stations provides an economic work-sharing system with inherent backup capability.

Figure 1 shows work-piece 1. This may be visualized as a single unit requiring operation 2 six times. Or it may be visualized as a tote containing a group of six elements 3 handled as a unit, with each element requiring operation 2 once. In either case, it is apparent that as this entity passes through the production line, operation 2 must be performed six times.

Figure 2 shows a series of three work-stations 10, 11, and 12, as usually arranged. Each station is capable of performing function 2 in any, or all, of the six positions required in work-piece 1. Normally, the work is shared, each station programmed to perform task 2 twice, with cumulative results shown, 4, 5, and 6.

If any one or two of the three stations fails, they are put in "bypass" mode, and the remaining operable station(s) ar...