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Filtered Cartridge Dispense for Spin-Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041033D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Christie, WR: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Electronics Industry state-of-the-art means of applying photoresist, which in itself is a polymer, is to have a container of this material in an adjacent room or "core area" and either pump or force out with a pressure vessel to the wafer handling and spinning tool with a length of tubing as long as eight feet. This means of dispensing photoresist is quite satisfactory for the standard resists but creates problems in two areas when trying to dispense HC (high contract) with imidizol or TNS because the dispensing apparatus now becomes a particle generator.

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Filtered Cartridge Dispense for Spin-Coating

The Electronics Industry state-of-the-art means of applying photoresist, which in itself is a polymer, is to have a container of this material in an adjacent room or "core area" and either pump or force out with a pressure vessel to the wafer handling and spinning tool with a length of tubing as long as eight feet. This means of dispensing photoresist is quite satisfactory for the standard resists but creates problems in two areas when trying to dispense HC (high contract) with imidizol or TNS because the dispensing apparatus now becomes a particle generator.

The long dispense tubing is difficult to keep particulate- free as some degree of polymerization is going to take place in the long lengths of tubing. Also, HC resist is difficult to mix, usually requiring a 24 hour mix before application, and is usually only mixed in small quantities.

A simple solution would be to add a filter inline between the photoresist container and the point of dispense. However, this creates additional problems. First, the long dispense tubing will require extra pressure to be applied if using a pressure vessel and nitrogen which will force the nitrogen to dissolve into the photoresist and then effervesce at the filter causing bubbles and ruin the product. Secondly, the long lines waste expensive photoresist and create enough particles to quickly clog the filter.

A filtered cartridge dispense for spin coating (see Figure) combines the rese...