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Improved Electroless Nickel Plating with the Use of Ultrasonic Energy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041040D
Original Publication Date: 1987-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Doss, SK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The electroless plating of nickel can be improved by the appli cation of ultrasonic energy to the plating bath during the deposition process. The aluminum-magnesium alloy article to be plated is cleaned with an alkaline etch, rinsed in distilled water placed in a diluted nitric acid deoxidizing solution, and again rinsed in distilled water. The article is placed in a bath containing the nickel ion electrolyte and sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. A high power ultrasonic probe is immersed in the tank containing the bath and ultrasonic energy is applied during plating. The process produces an excellent adhesion of the nickel-phosphorus film to the article and the rate of nickel phosphorus deposition is substantially increased.

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Improved Electroless Nickel Plating with the Use of Ultrasonic Energy

The electroless plating of nickel can be improved by the appli cation of ultrasonic energy to the plating bath during the deposition process. The aluminum-magnesium alloy article to be plated is cleaned with an alkaline etch, rinsed in distilled water placed in a diluted nitric acid deoxidizing solution, and again rinsed in distilled water. The article is placed in a bath containing the nickel ion electrolyte and sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. A high power ultrasonic probe is immersed in the tank containing the bath and ultrasonic energy is applied during plating. The process produces an excellent adhesion of the nickel-phosphorus film to the article and the rate of nickel phosphorus deposition is substantially increased. By the use of ultrasonic energy during electroless plating, the need for conventional preplating by a zinc immersion process is eliminated. The process has application to the deposition of nickel phosphorus films on high purity aluminum alloys.

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