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Copper-Polymer Adhesion Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041123D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones, CR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Copper adhesion to polymers, e.g. polyimide or epoxys, is quite poor. A thick layer of chromium (Cr) between the polymer and the copper substantially increases adhesion, but the process of applying the chromium-evaporation or sputtering precludes the use of less expensive copper deposition methodologies, such as direct lamination of copper foil. A process and material set which permits alternative methods of producing the chromium interlayer in situ by the use of an organometallic complex to the surface of a polymer is described in the following.

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Copper-Polymer Adhesion Process

Copper adhesion to polymers, e.g. polyimide or epoxys, is quite poor. A thick layer of chromium (Cr) between the polymer and the copper substantially increases adhesion, but the process of applying the chromium-evaporation or sputtering precludes the use of less expensive copper deposition methodologies, such as direct lamination of copper foil. A process and material set which permits alternative methods of producing the chromium interlayer in situ by the use of an organometallic complex to the surface of a polymer is described in the following.

Organometallic chromium complexes are well known, easy to handle from the vapor or solution, and can be thermally or photochemically converted to chromium metal. For example: ***** SEE ORIGINAL FOR MATHEMATICAL EQUATIONS IN DOCUMENT *****

Cr(CO)6 hv Cr + 6 CO

or heat

By applying (by dipping, spraying, or vapor deposition) an organometallic complex to the surface of a polymer, then laminating copper foil (or evaporating or sputtering), then heating (e.g., while laminating), a chromium metal interface is formed in situ.

The process is illustrated in the drawing.

Disclosed anonymously.

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