Browse Prior Art Database

Improved Drawer-slide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041150D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crawford, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Heavy mechanisms are often supported on drawer-type pull-out frames which are supported by, and slide on ball-bearing rails. Fig. 1 shows a cross-sectional view of a common rail configuration in which slide 1 rolls on ball bearings 2 which, in turn, roll in channel 3. The slide and the channel are designed, as shown, to provide a confining raceway for the ball bearings. In use, the weight of the mechanism may cause deformation of channel 3 which, if not detected, ultimately permits the ball bearings to escape and allows the mechanism to drop.

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Improved Drawer-slide

Heavy mechanisms are often supported on drawer-type pull-out frames which are supported by, and slide on ball-bearing rails. Fig. 1 shows a cross- sectional view of a common rail configuration in which slide 1 rolls on ball bearings 2 which, in turn, roll in channel 3. The slide and the channel are designed, as shown, to provide a confining raceway for the ball bearings. In use, the weight of the mechanism may cause deformation of channel 3 which, if not detected, ultimately permits the ball bearings to escape and allows the mechanism to drop.

Fig. 2 shows one way to avoid dropping of the mechanism. Slide 1 and channel 3 are designed with an added interlocking set of channels with clearance 4 between them. Fig. 3 shows, exaggerated, that with deformation of channel 3, clearance 4 disappears and slide 1 rests directly on channel 3 with metal-to- metal contact rather than gliding on the ball bearings. The greatly increased sliding friction provides an indication to an attendant that repairs are required.

Fig. 4 shows an alternate method in which slots 5 are cut in the lip of channel
3. If channel 3 deforms, as in Fig. 3, the ball bearings gravitate toward the lip of the channel, are captured by slots 5 and no longer roll freely. As in the above case, the resulting increased sliding friction provides an indication of needed repairs.

Disclosed anonymously.

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