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Power Cable Interconnect to Printed Circuit Board

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041193D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Layden, EC: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is often necessary to connect heavy power cables to a printed circuit board without causing the board to overheat at the interconnect area. The connector as shown in the figures uses a polarized male plug that includes contacts made of an electrically conductive material with a plurality of pins on each contact that are fastened by soldering, for instance, to a plurality of holes in the printed circuit board.

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Power Cable Interconnect to Printed Circuit Board

It is often necessary to connect heavy power cables to a printed circuit board without causing the board to overheat at the interconnect area. The connector as shown in the figures uses a polarized male plug that includes contacts made of an electrically conductive material with a plurality of pins on each contact that are fastened by soldering, for instance, to a plurality of holes in the printed circuit board.

Figure 1 shows the male plug comprising a housing 10 with thread forming screws 11 and a pair of contacts 12 and 13. Contact 13 is made of copper, for instance, and is formed as shown in Figures 2A and 2B to mate with resilient female contacts in the receptacle. Contact 12 is of the same shape with a notch along its length to provide polarity protection for the connector.

In Figures 2A and 2B, contact 13 includes a plurality of pins 14 for connection to a plurality of holes in the printed circuit board. The conductor portion 15 is narrowed and rounded at its tip for ease of mating with the blade of the female receptacle. The multiple attachment to the board distributes the current and avoids excessive heating while the two large contacts 12 and 13 can conduct the electrical current required by the board.

Disclosed anonymously.

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