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Modification of Zepel/Acrylic Barrier Emulsion Pressure-Vacuum Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041223D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ludington, RL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Zepel/Acrylic has been demonstrated to function as an effective ink barrier on four color dye-based ribbons. The usual way of creating a barrier on an impression fabric is to force the material into the fabric from one side while applying a vacuum suction from the other to insure complete coating of each fabric filament. Zepel/Acrylic barrier mixtures, however, cannot be applied in this way because the mixture contains 31% ethyl and isopropyl alcohols. In pilot lab trials, rapid evaporation of the alcohol caused immediate vacuum nozzle clogging. The alcohol also poses toxicity and flammability problems in a manufacturing environment necessitating solvent recovery equipment.

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Modification of Zepel/Acrylic Barrier Emulsion Pressure-Vacuum Application

Zepel/Acrylic has been demonstrated to function as an effective ink barrier on four color dye-based ribbons. The usual way of creating a barrier on an impression fabric is to force the material into the fabric from one side while applying a vacuum suction from the other to insure complete coating of each fabric filament. Zepel/Acrylic barrier mixtures, however, cannot be applied in this way because the mixture contains 31% ethyl and isopropyl alcohols. In pilot lab trials, rapid evaporation of the alcohol caused immediate vacuum nozzle clogging. The alcohol also poses toxicity and flammability problems in a manufacturing environment necessitating solvent recovery equipment.

A method is disclosed for making the mixture suitable for pressure/vacuum application without chemically changing the nature of the final barrier stripe. This method also removes the need for solvent recovery equipment at the barrier applicator and curing oven.

The alcohol and some water are removed from the commercial Acrylic via evaporation in suitable equipment. For the pilot runs, a rotary evaporator was used, production scale equipment is readily available or a vendor could be used to remove the alcohol. Solvent recovery is an integral part of these systems so that it would not present a problem.

After alcohol removal, the Acrylic is quite viscous but still in the form of a stable suspension. The viscosity is resto...