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Browse Prior Art Database

Parallel Output Video Camera

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041246D
Original Publication Date: 1987-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beck, VD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a parallel output video camera has the ability of producing a high frame rate. The concept uses parallel channels of video data by electrically dividing the target into several regions, each producing a current which becomes a video signal, in either monochrome or color. The technique is particularly applicable to multi-beam color video camera technology, for use in high definition television systems and for the purpose of studying high speed events.

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Parallel Output Video Camera

A technique is described whereby a parallel output video camera has the ability of producing a high frame rate. The concept uses parallel channels of video data by electrically dividing the target into several regions, each producing a current which becomes a video signal, in either monochrome or color. The technique is particularly applicable to multi-beam color video camera technology, for use in high definition television systems and for the purpose of studying high speed events.

Conventional vidicon camera tubes typically obtain signals by measuring an electron beam current as it flows into a single electrical target as shown in Fig. 1. The concept described herein implements the target into multiple parallel channels of video data, by electrically dividing the target into several regions.

The vidicon photoconductive target is divided into horizontal "stripes", as shown in Fig. 2. The vertical columns of the readout beams are scanned along the "stripes" so that each readout beam scans along a single "stripe" on the target. The readout beams are generated through the cathode and by the placement of the grid holes.

The pattern of readout beams automatically introduce appropriate delays between the different video channels, thereby eliminating the need for the receiving multi-beam CRT to de-skew the video data. The readout beams are generated from multi-beam cathode circuitry.

For high speed framing applications, the video target is divided into vertical "stripes"so that each readout beam scans horizontally across all target "stripes". In this application, the readout beams must be displaced horizontally from each other so that no target stripe is being addressed by more than one readout beam ...