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Microwatt Current-Controlled Gate Circuit Using Switchable Bypass Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041295D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balyoz, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The CCG (current-controlled gate) circuits of Figs. 1A and 1B, with which the disclosed switchable bypass network may be employed, are fully disclosed and described in [*]. The bypass network extends the push-pull operation of the CCG circuit to 100-microwatt power range. The use of the switchable bypass network provides (1) a high enough base-to-collector current to develop adequate coupling capacitance and (2) a return of the collector of T3 to a low enough voltage so that T5 is effectively held off. Referring to Figs. 1A and 1B, the reference 1 describes the operation of the CCG circuit and the DC biasing requirement of T3 to keep T5 at low current when the output is in the high state.

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Microwatt Current-Controlled Gate Circuit Using Switchable Bypass Network

The CCG (current-controlled gate) circuits of Figs. 1A and 1B, with which the disclosed switchable bypass network may be employed, are fully disclosed and described in [*]. The bypass network extends the push-pull operation of the CCG circuit to 100-microwatt power range. The use of the switchable bypass network provides (1) a high enough base-to-collector current to develop adequate coupling capacitance and (2) a return of the collector of T3 to a low enough voltage so that T5 is effectively held off. Referring to Figs. 1A and 1B, the reference 1 describes the operation of the CCG circuit and the DC biasing requirement of T3 to keep T5 at low current when the output is in the high state. The AC requirement for T3 is that enough current must flow to forward bias the B-C junction in order to obtain a large enough saturated capacitance at low power levels. These two requirements cannot be met simultaneously at the 100- microwatt power level using the CCG circuits of Figs. 1A or 1B. A solution is to modify the high power CCG circuit portion which is shown in Fig. 2, as shown in Fig. 3. Transistor T7, resistors RC7 and RB7 form a low resistance bypass network to maintain node El at a low voltage when the input is low and the output voltage is high (about 1.4 V). Note that of the 14.25 microamperes flowing from the collector of T3, only 5 mA flows in RCS with the remainder flowing in the bypass...