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Prevention of Ion Channelling by Molecular Ion Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041315D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Elsner, G: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When molecular ions are implanted into solids, the molecules are broken down into single atoms penetrating the solids at angles which are not perpendicular to the surface. This effect is used to eliminate the undesired channelling occurring during the implantation of ions into monocrystals for doping purposes. Extraordinarily high penetration depths result if the ions are implanted into silicon crystals in particular crystallographic directions, say, <110> or <100>. This effect is referred to as channelling. Standard processes for preventing such undesired channelling during silicon doping are implantation through amorphous surface layers and oblique incidence implantation. These processes have the disadvantage of respectively necessitating an additional step and of being ineffective during large angle electrostatic scanning.

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Prevention of Ion Channelling by Molecular Ion Implantation

When molecular ions are implanted into solids, the molecules are broken down into single atoms penetrating the solids at angles which are not perpendicular to the surface. This effect is used to eliminate the undesired channelling occurring during the implantation of ions into monocrystals for doping purposes. Extraordinarily high penetration depths result if the ions are implanted into silicon crystals in particular crystallographic directions, say, <110> or <100>. This effect is referred to as channelling. Standard processes for preventing such undesired channelling during silicon doping are implantation through amorphous surface layers and oblique incidence implantation. These processes have the disadvantage of respectively necessitating an additional step and of being ineffective during large angle electrostatic scanning. These disadvantages are prevented by molecular ion implantation, using, for example, As+ (2E) instead of As+ (E), because the molecule, upon impacting the crystal, is broken down into single atoms, each atom entering the crystal in a particular direction differing from that in which channelling occurs. This concept is supported by experimental data, according to which the sputter yield per atom of molecular ions is higher than that of atomic ions.

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