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Discrete Rotary Incrementer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041368D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Reed, AR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Intermittent rotational incrementation is often a desired output from a uniformly rotating input device. Applications are in the field of print line paper indexing and other similar incrementing functions. The apparatus illustrated in the figure provides rapid intermittent rotational output from a steadily rotating input. A steadily rotating input drive is provided to bushing 2 by a motor (not shown). Bushing 2 rotates smoothly on the surface of shaft 1 which is the output shaft for incremental rotation. A torsional spring 3 is attached at one end to bushing 2 and at the other end 4 either to the shaft 1 or the incrementing wheel 5 which is affixed to the shaft 1.

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Discrete Rotary Incrementer

Intermittent rotational incrementation is often a desired output from a uniformly rotating input device. Applications are in the field of print line paper indexing and other similar incrementing functions. The apparatus illustrated in the figure provides rapid intermittent rotational output from a steadily rotating input. A steadily rotating input drive is provided to bushing 2 by a motor (not shown). Bushing 2 rotates smoothly on the surface of shaft 1 which is the output shaft for incremental rotation. A torsional spring 3 is attached at one end to bushing 2 and at the other end 4 either to the shaft 1 or the incrementing wheel 5 which is affixed to the shaft 1. Incrementing wheel 5 has a plurality of depressions 6 in which ride a detent roller 7 mounted on flexible arms 8 pivoted in pivots 9 and anchored in a resilient spring holder attached to arms 8, as shown by spring 10. In order for the detenting wheel 5 to be rotated, the roller 7 must finally be deflected from the depression 6. The flexible arms 8 tend to hold the roller 7 at the very bottom of each depression 6. The angle on the sides of each depression 6 decreases rapidly away from the bottom such that when torsional force is applied, the roller 7 maintains its position until a large enough force results to deflect the flexible arm 8 against the spring tension 10. Then the roller moves from the bottom of each depression 6 and the wheel 5 will rotate easily and rapidly until the flexible arms 8...