Browse Prior Art Database

Keybutton Capturing Lens

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041370D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keplar, KW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Point-of-sale terminals often require changeable keybuttons to allow for reconfiguration of the functions of the keyboard. For example, a common change is to make a total key by joining together two adjacent single key positions on a keyboard. Reprogramming of the keyboard identifies the two adjacent keys when simultaneously pushed as a new function. Ordinarily, a new keybutton top is used to replace the two existing keybuttons. The new double-wide top will be fastened to each key stem. However, on curved keyboards or in situations where it is not desired to replace the two individual keybuttons, a new approach has been designed. Fig. 1 illustrates a typical standard keyboard with two key positions having keybuttons 1 each with an independent removable key lens top 2.

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Keybutton Capturing Lens

Point-of-sale terminals often require changeable keybuttons to allow for reconfiguration of the functions of the keyboard. For example, a common change is to make a total key by joining together two adjacent single key positions on a keyboard. Reprogramming of the keyboard identifies the two adjacent keys when simultaneously pushed as a new function. Ordinarily, a new keybutton top is used to replace the two existing keybuttons. The new double- wide top will be fastened to each key stem. However, on curved keyboards or in situations where it is not desired to replace the two individual keybuttons, a new approach has been designed. Fig. 1 illustrates a typical standard keyboard with two key positions having keybuttons 1 each with an independent removable key lens top 2. The lens 2 may be of clear plastic and snap on to the keybutton 1 to capture a label or indicia beneath the surface of the lens. Fig. 2 illustrates a modification in which a double-wide lens 3 is attached to two adjacent keybuttons 1 to replace the single lenses 2 that are removed. Instead of replacing the entire keybutton assembly, only the lenses are interchanged and the double-wide lens 3 captivates the two adjacent keybuttons 1 so that they move together when the lens 3 is depressed. If a curved keyboard is employed, slight clearance can be built in where lens 3 interfaces one of the buttons 1 and is tightly captured on the other button 1. This prevents binding as the k...