Browse Prior Art Database

Print-Transport-Driven Paper Guillotine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041372D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, RH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Fig. 1 illustrates a serial printer mechanism in part and shows the addition of an anvil and rolling cutter that forms a paper-cutting guillotine. This device is intended for use in a consumer transaction printer, such as those that are used in electronic cash registers and the like. These normally generate a customer receipt from a continuous roll of paper. The receipt must be cut or torn off at the desired length when printing is done. The disclosure herein describes a simple guillotine that is inexpensive, reliable and consumes little power and is driven by the transport of the print head back and forth along the printing line. In Fig. 1, the print head 1 is mounted on a carriage 2 on guides 3 for transport back and forth in and out of the plane of the paper, as shown in Fig. 1.

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Print-Transport-Driven Paper Guillotine

Fig. 1 illustrates a serial printer mechanism in part and shows the addition of an anvil and rolling cutter that forms a paper-cutting guillotine. This device is intended for use in a consumer transaction printer, such as those that are used in electronic cash registers and the like. These normally generate a customer receipt from a continuous roll of paper. The receipt must be cut or torn off at the desired length when printing is done. The disclosure herein describes a simple guillotine that is inexpensive, reliable and consumes little power and is driven by the transport of the print head back and forth along the printing line. In Fig. 1, the print head 1 is mounted on a carriage 2 on guides 3 for transport back and forth in and out of the plane of the paper, as shown in Fig. 1. Paper 4 traverses past a platen 5 and a cutter bar 6. The cutter bar 6 is withdrawn from the plane of the platen impact surface 7 by a detent spring 8 rigidly affixed to the machine frame. A roller cutter 9 can nip the paper against the cutting anvil 6 when the anvil is moved forward. Fig. 2 illustrates a top view of the print head and guillotine mechanism. The cutting anvil 6 is shown in its retracted position in a top view. Pins 10 are in V-shaped slots 11 that have unequal legs. When the pin 10 is in the longer leg as shown, the anvil 6 is in its retracted position under the urging of tension springs 8. To move the anvil forward, print head 1 and carriage 3 are moved toward the extr...