Browse Prior Art Database

Compact Paper Guillotine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041374D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Colby, GC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Many point-of-sale terminal devices incorporate printers. The printers usually print on continuous rolls of paper tape that are used for customer receipts and for a journal copy of cash register or terminal entries. Paper-cutting devices may normally be simple tear-off strips or the like. However, it is more effective to provide a guillotine to sever the paper and provide a neatly cut paper form. Many of these designs employ a pivoted cutting blade in the fashion of scissors. Typically, blade movement in such devices is activated by motors or solenoids. The design shown here performs the same functions as the scissor-type design but utilizes a sliding motion that eliminates wasted space needed for locating a pivot point and reduces the overall thickness in a simple and compact design.

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Compact Paper Guillotine

Many point-of-sale terminal devices incorporate printers. The printers usually print on continuous rolls of paper tape that are used for customer receipts and for a journal copy of cash register or terminal entries. Paper-cutting devices may normally be simple tear-off strips or the like. However, it is more effective to provide a guillotine to sever the paper and provide a neatly cut paper form. Many of these designs employ a pivoted cutting blade in the fashion of scissors. Typically, blade movement in such devices is activated by motors or solenoids. The design shown here performs the same functions as the scissor-type design but utilizes a sliding motion that eliminates wasted space needed for locating a pivot point and reduces the overall thickness in a simple and compact design. In the figure, the base 1 includes a stationary knife edge 2. The base and knife edge can be mounted to a framework 3 within the machine in the path which the paper traverses. The paper path is generally delimited by the side guides in frame 3 identified as guides 4. Fastening devices 5 hold the base unit 1 with cutting blade 2 in position with the cutting blade 2 in the line of travel of the paper between guides 4. Apertures 6 and nuts 7 can be used, for example, in conjunction with the fasteners 5, as shown. A cooperating knife edge 8 is included in the sliding plate member that has a large aperture 9 through which the paper form is fed between guides 4. The edge 8 is bent down slightly in the sli...