Browse Prior Art Database

Technique for Microprocessor Register Dump

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041407D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cianciosi, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A microprocessor in an I/O device requires that information about the processor, such as the contents of the general purpose and local storage registers, be preserved so that an analysis can be made of problems that may have caused the microprocessor to stop executing or to be "hung." This article describes a technique whereby this function can be performed by the microprocessor with minimum support by the host system attached to the microprocessor when the microprocessor storage is dumped to the host system. The register data as a result of a dump is saved in the I/O microprocessor's own storage as part of the dump function. This is accomplished by having the host processor load a short routine into low storage of the microprocessor.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Technique for Microprocessor Register Dump

A microprocessor in an I/O device requires that information about the processor, such as the contents of the general purpose and local storage registers, be preserved so that an analysis can be made of problems that may have caused the microprocessor to stop executing or to be "hung." This article describes a technique whereby this function can be performed by the microprocessor with minimum support by the host system attached to the microprocessor when the microprocessor storage is dumped to the host system. The register data as a result of a dump is saved in the I/O microprocessor's own storage as part of the dump function. This is accomplished by having the host processor load a short routine into low storage of the microprocessor. The routine reads the registers and stores them in a predefined area of low storage which does not destroy existing data in the microprocessor storage. This storage area is typically unused in normal operations of the microprocessor or an area that would not be interesting in a dump output. To facilitate saving the registers, the host sends short routines for each group of registers. This destroys the least possible storage area of pertinent dump data. The following advantages are realized using this technique: 1) A minimal amount of storage in the microprocessor is required to save registers that are valuable to analyze

problems. 2) Formatting any register data on the host side after

recei...