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Molecular Matrix Printing Based on Anodic Stripping of METAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041427D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aviram, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Molecular Matrix Printing is a term loosely employed to describe printing by electrochemical modification of compounds from colorless to colored, while on the surface of paper, by employing very thin electrodes (2-4 mils) and a wet paper surface. Usually a leuco dye is electrochemically oxidized to a dye, or iodide is oxidized to iodine, which complexes with starch to form a blue color, etc. This printing method suffers from some instability associated with the leuco dye which is susceptible to slow air oxidation. The spontaneous oxidation leads to background coloration. To provide improved printing a modified approach is used including the use of a consumable broad electrode on the opposite side of the paper from the stylus electrode.

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Molecular Matrix Printing Based on Anodic Stripping of METAL

Molecular Matrix Printing is a term loosely employed to describe printing by electrochemical modification of compounds from colorless to colored, while on the surface of paper, by employing very thin electrodes (2-4 mils) and a wet paper surface. Usually a leuco dye is electrochemically oxidized to a dye, or iodide is oxidized to iodine, which complexes with starch to form a blue color, etc. This printing method suffers from some instability associated with the leuco dye which is susceptible to slow air oxidation. The spontaneous oxidation leads to background coloration. To provide improved printing a modified approach is used including the use of a consumable broad electrode on the opposite side of the paper from the stylus electrode. It is well known that some compounds (organic and inorganic) form complexes with metal ions. Some combinations can be listed in which a colorless compound becomes colored when it complexes to metal ions, and in fact such materials are used extensively in analytical chemistry for colorimetric determination of metal ions. The colors formed are very specific to the complex composition. It is not uncommon that some materials will form one color with ion A and a different color with ion B. A mixture of 1:1 of dimethylglyoxine and diethyldithiocarbonate 200 mg in 20 g ethanol water 1:1 solution and 1 g of KBr as electrolyte was used for electrochemical coloration. The electrodes were: Cathode: W or Pt or Ta Anode: A metal whose ions were designed to complex with the complexing agents in the electrolyte.

Suitable metals are as follows: ANODE METAL COLOR OF COMPLEX OBTAINED Mo Purple Ni Red Cu Brown Stainless Steel

Dark Brown Ni/Cr alloy Yellow This coloration is due to stripping of metal ions from the anode, essentially the opposite to electroplating, and comp...