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Non-Jamming Gear Clutch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041440D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCullough, EJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Friction clutches are conventionally used to couple a driven shaft with a driving shaft. Such clutches are relatively expensive due to the fact that they require one shaft to be floating so that it will always be in contact with the clutch surface. Gear clutches are known and have the advantage over friction clutches of being less expensive when molded gears are used because such gears are themselves inexpensive and fewer parts are required for a gear clutch since there is no floating shaft. In addition, bearing loads are lower for gear clutches, requiring less power to drive. The principle problem with gear clutches is the possibility of gear lockup if the driven gear does not mesh with the driving gear when the two gears are engaged. This problem is solved by the gear clutch mechanism shown in Fig. 1.

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Non-Jamming Gear Clutch

Friction clutches are conventionally used to couple a driven shaft with a driving shaft. Such clutches are relatively expensive due to the fact that they require one shaft to be floating so that it will always be in contact with the clutch surface. Gear clutches are known and have the advantage over friction clutches of being less expensive when molded gears are used because such gears are themselves inexpensive and fewer parts are required for a gear clutch since there is no floating shaft. In addition, bearing loads are lower for gear clutches, requiring less power to drive. The principle problem with gear clutches is the possibility of gear lockup if the driven gear does not mesh with the driving gear when the two gears are engaged. This problem is solved by the gear clutch mechanism shown in Fig. 1. Gear B is the drive gear and is constantly turning. Clutch gear A is at rest and loaded into magnet armature D by a flat spring C. A recess in clutch gear A keeps the clutch gear from being engaged with the drive gear B. When the magnet is picked, armature D releases clutch gear A and spring C forces the clutch gear to rotate clockwise until it becomes engaged with the driving gear B. If the timing of the release of clutch gear A and the position of driving gear B are synchronized, the gears will mesh perfectly, but if they are not, a tooth-to-tooth lockup could occur. Fig. 2 shows a tooth-to-tooth lockup; however, this is not a problem in...