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Browse Prior Art Database

Image Registration Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041459D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

VanCleave, GW: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes an apparatus and technique for registering transfer sheets on the photoconductor (PC) belt of a belt-type copier. An encoding device is mounted to the shaft of the roller which drives the PC belt. This encoder drives a counter which is initialized by a sync-mark pulse. The sync-mark pulse is obtained from a hole sensor associated with the belt. Following initialization of the counter, a count is accumulated. The count is representative of the distance between the imaging station and the transfer station. As soon as this count is accumulated, the image on the belt is transferred to the transfer sheet and a pulse (generated from the hole sensor) resets the counter. The cycle then repeats for another imaging panel. Fig. 1 shows one of a plurality of configurations for a belt-type copier.

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Image Registration Technique

This article describes an apparatus and technique for registering transfer sheets on the photoconductor (PC) belt of a belt-type copier. An encoding device is mounted to the shaft of the roller which drives the PC belt. This encoder drives a counter which is initialized by a sync-mark pulse. The sync-mark pulse is obtained from a hole sensor associated with the belt. Following initialization of the counter, a count is accumulated. The count is representative of the distance between the imaging station and the transfer station. As soon as this count is accumulated, the image on the belt is transferred to the transfer sheet and a pulse (generated from the hole sensor) resets the counter. The cycle then repeats for another imaging panel. Fig. 1 shows one of a plurality of configurations for a belt-type copier. The PC belt is driven by drive roller 10. An optical encoder 12 is mounted to the drive roller. The image writing line indicates the zone where an image to be reproduced is deposited on the photoconductor. The transfer area denotes the zone where a latent image is transferred to a transfer medium (not shown). The photoconductor belt is fitted with a series of index holes and a seam (Fig. 2). The holes are used to identify the zone where images are formed on the photoconductor. The holes are sensed by index hole sensor 14. The index hole sensor generates the control pulses which are used to reset the control counter (not shown). Fig...