Browse Prior Art Database

High Speed Digital-To-Analog Tool Controller

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041480D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bojman, W: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a digital controller for an analog system, e.g., an electron beam tool, digital data is typically applied to a digital-to-analog converter, and the resulting analog voltage is amplified and applied to the tool. An enable signal is provided to enable the tool once all the components in the controller have settled. Disclosed herein is a multi-channel tool controller which eliminates the above-described settling time delay to thereby speed up tool operation. Referring to the figure, the controller operates with a minimum of two channels of registers 1, 2, digital-to-analog converters 3, 4 and amplifiers 5, 6. A high speed electronic switch 8 selects either channel A or B. A suitable timing circuit 7 assures that the proper sequence of clock pulses and channel selection is maintained, and also controls the tool enable time.

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High Speed Digital-To-Analog Tool Controller

In a digital controller for an analog system, e.g., an electron beam tool, digital data is typically applied to a digital-to-analog converter, and the resulting analog voltage is amplified and applied to the tool. An enable signal is provided to enable the tool once all the components in the controller have settled. Disclosed herein is a multi-channel tool controller which eliminates the above-described settling time delay to thereby speed up tool operation. Referring to the figure, the controller operates with a minimum of two channels of registers 1, 2, digital-to- analog converters 3, 4 and amplifiers 5, 6. A high speed electronic switch 8 selects either channel A or B. A suitable timing circuit 7 assures that the proper sequence of clock pulses and channel selection is maintained, and also controls the tool enable time. The timing is such that within one channel, a complete operating cycle elapses between the application of a clock pulse to the register 1 or 2 and the application of the tool voltage to the tool. This time is adequate for all the components of the channel to settle down. During this operating cycle, the tool is connected to the other channel which was updated one cycle earlier. Thus, by alternating between two channels, the tool is continuously active (except for the switching time of switch 8). It will be noted that if one operating cycle is insufficient to settle all the components of a channel, t...