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Controlled Pore Formation in Magnetic Disk Coatings to Optimize Lubricant Retention

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041483D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lorenz, MR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Presented here is a technique to increase lubricant retention in magnetic disk coatings to give better wear characteristics and longer and more reliable product life. It appears that lubricant is nonuniformly distributed on the surface of magnetic disk coatings. This is probably more so for the more heavily lubricated disk coatings. Wherever there is a heavy lubricant concentration on the surface, sputtering away the surface lubricant reveals one or more pores (or holes) in the coatings that appear to "anchor" the surface lubricant. It is proposed to add particulate matter that has the property of forming voids by evaporation or dissolution. These particles must be dispersible in the liquid magnetic coating, and they must be insoluble and thermally stable during the coating formulation and up to the coating process.

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Controlled Pore Formation in Magnetic Disk Coatings to Optimize Lubricant Retention

Presented here is a technique to increase lubricant retention in magnetic disk coatings to give better wear characteristics and longer and more reliable product life. It appears that lubricant is nonuniformly distributed on the surface of magnetic disk coatings. This is probably more so for the more heavily lubricated disk coatings. Wherever there is a heavy lubricant concentration on the surface, sputtering away the surface lubricant reveals one or more pores (or holes) in the coatings that appear to "anchor" the surface lubricant. It is proposed to add particulate matter that has the property of forming voids by evaporation or dissolution. These particles must be dispersible in the liquid magnetic coating, and they must be insoluble and thermally stable during the coating formulation and up to the coating process. Let us assume that we will form the pores or voids during the curing cycle. For example, particles of the polyacetal class of polymers can be discretely distributed in the coating. During curing at elevated temperatures, these polymer particles will revert to monomers which will evaporate and leave the desired voids behind. By controlling the concentration and size of the particles, the concentration and size of the voids can be manipulated. Other classes of particles may be used which dissolve during the wash cycle after buffing and leave a void behind. These could be...