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Expedient for Reestablishing Suspended Program Execution in a Synchronous Operating System Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041484D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Allen, WH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In data processing operations involving the execution of programs, suspensions of programs are often necessary to allow the operating system to use the processor (CPU) during significant waiting times. In a multi-tasking system, a dispatcher is available to resume a program's execution once it has been suspended. However, in a synchronous operating system environment, there is no dispatcher, and another method is needed to resume operation of the suspended program. A system clock or timer must be used to monitor each suspended program to see if the conditions are appropriate for resuming execution. Upon the obtainment of such conditions, the program is again called. Two typical situations requiring such timing are set forth as follows: 1.

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Expedient for Reestablishing Suspended Program Execution in a Synchronous Operating System Environment

In data processing operations involving the execution of programs, suspensions of programs are often necessary to allow the operating system to use the processor (CPU) during significant waiting times. In a multi-tasking system, a dispatcher is available to resume a program's execution once it has been suspended. However, in a synchronous operating system environment, there is no dispatcher, and another method is needed to resume operation of the suspended program. A system clock or timer must be used to monitor each suspended program to see if the conditions are appropriate for resuming execution. Upon the obtainment of such conditions, the program is again called. Two typical situations requiring such timing are set forth as follows: 1. Straight delays - A certain amount of time must pass before processing can be allowed to continue. This is the case when waiting for an external device to come up or settle down. 2. Failsafe delays - If an expected (or required) response from an external device (or program) is not received within a specified time (e.g., 10 seconds), then a method is needed to resume the suspended program when the time limit is exceeded. This is the case when a program, such as printer, sharing in machine A "converses" with a corresponding program in machine B. In other words, the failure of machine B to respond does not hold up processing in ma...