Browse Prior Art Database

Display of Graphs and Charts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041506D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Convis, DB: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The mere conversion of numeric data values into bar, pie and line charts is not sufficient graphics support in today's highly competitive word processing display technology. One of the foremost requirements is an ability to draw rectilinear line drawings, such as organization charts, circuit diagrams, floor plans, etc., and integrate them with textual information. The apparatus disclosed here allows the user to construct free-form rectilinear charts, such as organization charts, using today's restricted hardware. a blank screen and to allow him, by pressing a key, to toggle into and out of a 'cursor draw mode'. While in this mode, use of the normal cursor movement keys not only moves the cursor but leaves a trailing line.

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Display of Graphs and Charts

The mere conversion of numeric data values into bar, pie and line charts is not sufficient graphics support in today's highly competitive word processing display technology. One of the foremost requirements is an ability to draw rectilinear line drawings, such as organization charts, circuit diagrams, floor plans, etc., and integrate them with textual information. The apparatus disclosed here allows the user to construct free-form rectilinear charts, such as organization charts, using today's restricted hardware. a blank screen and to allow him, by pressing a key, to toggle into and out of a 'cursor draw mode'. While in this mode, use of the normal cursor movement keys not only moves the cursor but leaves a trailing line. Anytime the direction of the cursor movement changes from horizontal to vertical or vice versa, a corner graphic character will be placed at that point, depending on the surrounding annotation characters and the direction of the cursor movement. Anytime two lines meet, a 'T' or '+' intersection character will be used to join the lines. The display characters used in this process are shown in the figure. The user may then toggle back to 'normal' (no-draw) cursor movement mode, position the cursor, and annotate alphanumeric information onto the chart (e.g., fill-in title in an organization chart). In a similar fashion the drawn material may be deleted through the simple expedient of a cursor erase function.

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