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Improved Steering Alarm for Printer Back-Up Roll

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041510D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Osterhoudt, KA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 illustrates an improved gimballed bearing utilized in connection with a back-up roll and hot roll combination designed for use in a hot roll printer. When forms are processed through a printer utilizing a hot roll and back-up roll combination, wear occurs on either the hot roll or the back-up roll, particularly as thicker forms are handled. The wear results in a requirement for increased force to steer the paper. However, at the same time, the hot roll to back-up roll center lines become less parallel. This misalignment must be compensated for within the internal clearance dimensions of the bearing, i.e., the inner race to ball to outer race. As operating temperatures rise due to uneven heat transfer of the components, this clearance diminishes to a very low figure.

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Improved Steering Alarm for Printer Back-Up Roll

Fig. 1 illustrates an improved gimballed bearing utilized in connection with a back-up roll and hot roll combination designed for use in a hot roll printer. When forms are processed through a printer utilizing a hot roll and back-up roll combination, wear occurs on either the hot roll or the back-up roll, particularly as thicker forms are handled. The wear results in a requirement for increased force to steer the paper. However, at the same time, the hot roll to back-up roll center lines become less parallel. This misalignment must be compensated for within the internal clearance dimensions of the bearing, i.e., the inner race to ball to outer race. As operating temperatures rise due to uneven heat transfer of the components, this clearance diminishes to a very low figure. The steering motor at that point must apply more force to overcome the bearing stiffness, yet has still not transferred that force into paper steering capability. Since the usual steering motor is limited to a fairly narrow operating range, any additional force added is quickly consumed in overcoming the bearing stiffness, thereby leading to paper steering errors which are usually corrected by the replacement of the back-up roll and the hot roll. The spherical bearing design, illustrated in Fig. 2, includes a gimbal-type mounting which permits steering force to be applied directly to the back-up roll. This greatly increases the effective life of...