Browse Prior Art Database

Robotic Air Driver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041519D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Booker, SE: AUTHOR

Abstract

There is shown and described an automatic screwdriver directly compatible with a light duty robotic assembly. This air-powered device weighs less than one pound and is under four inches long. It is particularly suited for use with the IBM 7565 Manufacturing System, a highly precise manipulator. The device shown in the figures solves problems associated with commercially available air drivers. Such drivers weigh approximately two pounds. This weight consumes a significant portion of the robot's payload capacity. The nine-inch length of a standard driver prohibits locating the driver directly between the grippers of the manipulator for so doing would place the driver tip at least six inches from the grippers.

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Robotic Air Driver

There is shown and described an automatic screwdriver directly compatible with a light duty robotic assembly. This air-powered device weighs less than one pound and is under four inches long. It is particularly suited for use with the IBM 7565 Manufacturing System, a highly precise manipulator. The device shown in the figures solves problems associated with commercially available air drivers. Such drivers weigh approximately two pounds. This weight consumes a significant portion of the robot's payload capacity. The nine-inch length of a standard driver prohibits locating the driver directly between the grippers of the manipulator for so doing would place the driver tip at least six inches from the grippers. Such a position compounds the rotary error of the machine and creates a significant dynamic moment on the pitch axis during transport. The shorter length of the driver shown in the figures permits it to be held directly by the manipulator. The driver tip is thus positioned approximately 1.5 inches below and on axis with the gripper. This axial relationship cancels all screw-driving moment. The low weight of the driver substantially reduces the dynamic moment during transport. Fig. 1 shows the driver in its rest position with each of the two springs 4 and 6 completely extended. Spring 4 is stiffer than spring 6 so that during compression, spring 6 collapses first to permit drive bit 8 to be exposed for operative engagement with the screw. Pic...