Browse Prior Art Database

Angled Shingler on Cut-Sheet Feeder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041563D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gibson, DK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The shingler of a cut-sheet feeder is angled slightly relative to a reference edge to drive the sheets from a supply in a manner that eliminates paper position errors and removes tolerance requirements between the paper and the supply bin. Supply cassette 10 contains a stack of cut-sheet paper 11. Shingler wheel 12 is angled slightly, as indicated at 15, to feed sheet 11 slightly in the direction 16. As the sheet is fed out of bin 10 in direction 18, angled shingler 12 causes sheet 11 to contact the rear bin constraint or reference edge 20, and continue feeding in direction arrangement with its reference edge 26. Any tolerance between paper stack 11 and bin constraint 20 is removed. Further, aligners and unnecessary length of transfer area 25 are avoided.

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Angled Shingler on Cut-Sheet Feeder

The shingler of a cut-sheet feeder is angled slightly relative to a reference edge to drive the sheets from a supply in a manner that eliminates paper position errors and removes tolerance requirements between the paper and the supply bin. Supply cassette 10 contains a stack of cut-sheet paper 11. Shingler wheel 12 is angled slightly, as indicated at 15, to feed sheet 11 slightly in the direction
16. As the sheet is fed out of bin 10 in direction 18, angled shingler 12 causes sheet 11 to contact the rear bin constraint or reference edge 20, and continue feeding in direction arrangement with its reference edge 26. Any tolerance between paper stack 11 and bin constraint 20 is removed. Further, aligners and unnecessary length of transfer area 25 are avoided. This allows a relatively short transfer paper path 25 between the exit of bin 10 and the elements which must operate upon sheets 11 downstream, such as the image transfer area of a xerographic copier, printer or the like. In one typical operating example, angle 15 at two-degrees was found adequate.

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