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Graphics System With Means for Checking Alignment of Parts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041568D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bahri, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A graphics system permits a user to define a plug gauge and to use the gauge to check the alignment of parts that are to be connected in an assembly. Parts that are to be connected are given matching holes that should be aligned when the two parts are assembled. The plug gauge is given the diameter and the combined length of two holes, minus an appropriate tolerance. A user of the system positions the gauge in one of two holes, and the system then uses conventional techniques to check for interference between the plug gauge and the other part. The holes can represent actual holes that will receive alignment or fastening components, or they can be created in the graphics system only for the test. Some graphics systems represent objects as a set of equations for lines.

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Graphics System With Means for Checking Alignment of Parts

A graphics system permits a user to define a plug gauge and to use the gauge to check the alignment of parts that are to be connected in an assembly. Parts that are to be connected are given matching holes that should be aligned when the two parts are assembled. The plug gauge is given the diameter and the combined length of two holes, minus an appropriate tolerance. A user of the system positions the gauge in one of two holes, and the system then uses conventional techniques to check for interference between the plug gauge and the other part. The holes can represent actual holes that will receive alignment or fastening components, or they can be created in the graphics system only for the test. Some graphics systems represent objects as a set of equations for lines. A cylinder or a cylindrical hole is represented by the equations for two coaxial circles and a number of lines that connect corresponding points on the circles. The circles have a selected diameter, and the lines have a selected length. These systems also have means for detecting interference between two objects.

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