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Processor-Communicated ASCII Code Used to Control Printing System Operating With EBCDIC Code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041583D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Allen, WH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In present-day data processing or word processing environments, it is not unusual for word processing devices, such as printers, to be controlled by remote processors which must communicate instructions to the printer. The processor may use ASCII code for such communicated information exchange. ASCII consists of 7-bit coded characters. Where the controlled system, such as the printer, utilizes an 8-bit code, such as EBCDIC, translation of the code is, of course, necessary. In addition, such variations in code used may present other problems. For example, in the case where the host processor controls a printer, the host may be utilizing a control system wherein a line feed is appended to any carriage return.

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Processor-Communicated ASCII Code Used to Control Printing System Operating With EBCDIC Code

In present-day data processing or word processing environments, it is not unusual for word processing devices, such as printers, to be controlled by remote processors which must communicate instructions to the printer. The processor may use ASCII code for such communicated information exchange. ASCII consists of 7-bit coded characters. Where the controlled system, such as the printer, utilizes an 8-bit code, such as EBCDIC, translation of the code is, of course, necessary. In addition, such variations in code used may present other problems. For example, in the case where the host processor controls a printer, the host may be utilizing a control system wherein a line feed is appended to any carriage return. This poses a problem with respect to the printer when the operator would like to perform a "zero index carriage return" in order to overprint or underscore. In the case where a printer system utilizes the EBCDIC code, which is an 8-bit code, advantage may be taken of the fact that the incoming code from the processor is a 7-bit ASCII code. In such a situation, the 8-bit position of the incoming 7-bit ASCII code may be used to "fake out" the system and pass the zero index carriage return on through the system without any line feed. The system looks for a match without the high-order or 8-bit on in the incoming code. Thus, it will not match as it passes through the syste...