Browse Prior Art Database

Technique for Reversal Processing of Sulfone-Sensitized Resists

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041589D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barry, JA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique for reversing images in sulfone-sensitized novolak resists (a positive-working E-beam resist) was developed from an attempt to increase the induction time of unexposed regions. Four wafers were processed up to the development step. The development was interrupted at various points during the development cycle for different wafers. In each case, the sample was then rinsed, blown dry, and then baked for one minute on a 105ŒC hot plate. After the bakes, the wafers were again immersed in the developer. 1. Interrupted at 200% beyond exposed endpoint: The induction was increased dramatically T so the unexposed regions did not dissolve any further even after an additional 400%. 2. Interrupted after 2^ peaks of the exposed endpoint trace (about 7000 ^ of resist remaining): No differences were observed.

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Technique for Reversal Processing of Sulfone-Sensitized Resists

A technique for reversing images in sulfone-sensitized novolak resists (a positive-working E-beam resist) was developed from an attempt to increase the induction time of unexposed regions. Four wafers were processed up to the development step. The development was interrupted at various points during the development cycle for different wafers. In each case, the sample was then rinsed, blown dry, and then baked for one minute on a 105OEC hot plate. After the bakes, the wafers were again immersed in the developer. 1. Interrupted at 200% beyond exposed endpoint: The induction was increased dramatically T so the unexposed regions did not dissolve any further even after an additional 400%. 2. Interrupted after 2^ peaks of the exposed endpoint trace (about 7000 ^ of resist remaining): No differences were observed. Both exposed and unexposed regions continued to develop. 3. Interrupted at the endpoint of the exposed region: The unexposed induction time increased. 4. Interrupted after 4^ peaks of the exposed endpoint trace (about 3000 of resist remaining): The unexposed regions began to develop away at approximately the normal rate and the dissolution rate of the exposed regions was drastically reduced (Fig 1). The development of the fourth wafer was stopped just prior to the unexposed endpoint (Fig. 1). What resulted was a very thin film in the unexposed regions and a maximum of 4000 ~ of resist was measured...