Browse Prior Art Database

Dry Lithographic Process Employing Microspheres

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041592D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gregor, LV: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article relates to a method for completely dry production of a patterned resist layer. It involves the use of microspheres of the resist material, e.g., PMMA, novolak resin, etc. Any organic material which forms microspherical particles may be used; such spheres are available down to 0.25 m in diameter, and essentially smaller sizes could be obtained, if desired. The spheres are lightly charged by rubbing or radiation, and the working surface is slightly charged in the opposite sense (Fig. 1A). When brought in contact, the spheres are attracted to and held to the surface (Fig. 1B). Thickness is regulated by extent of charging, temperature, gas environment, etc.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Dry Lithographic Process Employing Microspheres

This article relates to a method for completely dry production of a patterned resist layer. It involves the use of microspheres of the resist material, e.g., PMMA, novolak resin, etc. Any organic material which forms microspherical particles may be used; such spheres are available down to 0.25 m in diameter, and essentially smaller sizes could be obtained, if desired. The spheres are lightly charged by rubbing or radiation, and the working surface is slightly charged in the opposite sense (Fig. 1A). When brought in contact, the spheres are attracted to and held to the surface (Fig. 1B). Thickness is regulated by extent of charging, temperature, gas environment, etc. When the appropriate thickness is achieved, the sample is exposed by electron bombardment in the desired pattern by controlling the accelerating potential of the electron beam. The secondary electron emission coefficient of the microspheres can be made positive or negative. Depending on the conditions, the irradiated microspheres can be made to repel each other (positive image, Fig. 1C) or be attracted more to the substrate (negative image). After exposure, the sample is mechanically and thermally treated to remove unwanted microspheres and lightly fuse the remaining spheres into a uniform film.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]