Browse Prior Art Database

Calendar Security

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041619D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vincent, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Many individual needs are met by coding a calendar and restricting access to the coding rather than restricting access to the calendar itself. The events of one's day are often considered personal in nature. Although personal, the degree of privacy to be extended to such events ranges from complete secrecy to complete openness. For certain events, the degree of privacy required is greater than complete openness. This, though, is related to the position held by another wanting or needing access to the schedule. For example, a secretary may require complete access to a principal's calendar, while a co-worker may need only know that some time period is filled with an event. When a calendar is entrusted to a computer installation, it is essential that calendar access be controlled.

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Calendar Security

Many individual needs are met by coding a calendar and restricting access to the coding rather than restricting access to the calendar itself. The events of one's day are often considered personal in nature. Although personal, the degree of privacy to be extended to such events ranges from complete secrecy to complete openness. For certain events, the degree of privacy required is greater than complete openness. This, though, is related to the position held by another wanting or needing access to the schedule. For example, a secretary may require complete access to a principal's calendar, while a co-worker may need only know that some time period is filled with an event. When a calendar is entrusted to a computer installation, it is essential that calendar access be controlled. Consider an implementation where all events for a single month are displayed on a single screen with each event abbreviated by a single character. This character can be assigned by the owner of the calendar in any meaningful way. For example, meetings can be designated "M", vacations designated "V", and so forth. As alluded to earlier, there are certain individuals who should not have access to the assignment scheme, but may still need to know if a time period is already scheduled. For these individuals the assigned codes are neutralized through the presentation of a character, such as "-". At the time of the preparation of the calendar, a determination is made as to the...