Browse Prior Art Database

High Precision Stator/Rotor Quality

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041698D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Siverling, MM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A motor winding quality detector tests windings individually about a single pole to simplify identification of fabrication errors, such as too many turns, too few turns or shorted turns. Since a conductor usually has subwinding portions about several poles or groups of poles, error detection is more easily accomplished by testing each subwinding portion separately. In a 200-turn winding formed as 4 subwindings, it is easier to identify more or fewer turns in a 50-turn subwinding than the entire 200 turns of the total winding. Fig. 1 shows a part under test. The winding 5 shown could have any number of turns about the pole pieces 6. It is assumed that the winding continues and goes around some number of additional sets of pole pieces elsewhere on the part.

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High Precision Stator/Rotor Quality

A motor winding quality detector tests windings individually about a single pole to simplify identification of fabrication errors, such as too many turns, too few turns or shorted turns. Since a conductor usually has subwinding portions about several poles or groups of poles, error detection is more easily accomplished by testing each subwinding portion separately. In a 200-turn winding formed as 4 subwindings, it is easier to identify more or fewer turns in a 50-turn subwinding than the entire 200 turns of the total winding. Fig. 1 shows a part under test. The winding 5 shown could have any number of turns about the pole pieces 6. It is assumed that the winding continues and goes around some number of additional sets of pole pieces elsewhere on the part. The solution to accurately test the part is to create a magnetic path 7, as shown in the figure. This magnetic path involves only the particular turns being tested. The excitation coil 8, when driven, only excites the magnetic path, whereas the winding on the part, if it were driven, would drive additional paths due to the other poles involved in the winding. To test these turns and pole material, the excitation coil is driven with a known signal, and the result is read across the winding on the part. A change in the turns ratio between the excitation coil and the coil wound on the pole under test is detected as well as a change in efficiency of transfer function, due to a sho...