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Bubble/Void-Free Silicone Dielectric Gel Dispense-Cure Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041708D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, JC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An improved process is disclosed for mixing and dispensing silicon dielectric gel onto semiconductor chips and modules, which reduces the quantity of entrapped air and gases in the gel layer. Silicone dielectric gels consist of two components: a resin and hardener. After the two components are mixed, a vacuum is applied to the mixture to remove entrained gases and moisture, and then the mixture is placed in a sealed container and is stored in a freezer. To dispense the mixture, it is brought to room temperature. The circuit module and the integrated circuit chip mounted thereon are heated to an elevated temperature so that when the silicone gel is applied, its viscosity will be reduced and it will readily flow beneath the chip without entraining air bubbles.

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Bubble/Void-Free Silicone Dielectric Gel Dispense-Cure Process

An improved process is disclosed for mixing and dispensing silicon dielectric gel onto semiconductor chips and modules, which reduces the quantity of entrapped air and gases in the gel layer. Silicone dielectric gels consist of two components: a resin and hardener. After the two components are mixed, a vacuum is applied to the mixture to remove entrained gases and moisture, and then the mixture is placed in a sealed container and is stored in a freezer. To dispense the mixture, it is brought to room temperature. The circuit module and the integrated circuit chip mounted thereon are heated to an elevated temperature so that when the silicone gel is applied, its viscosity will be reduced and it will readily flow beneath the chip without entraining air bubbles. By degassing the mixture prior to storage and by preheating the module prior to the application of the gel, the entraining of air and low molecular weight gas products is minimized. This increases the throughput and improves the quality of the encapsulation in the manufacture of semiconductor modules.

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