Browse Prior Art Database

Character by Character Display, Shading of Displayed Graphics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041715D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crehan, DT: AUTHOR

Abstract

The present expedient relates to word processing systems having interactive display terminals, and more particularly to such systems with terminals having "character box displays", i.e., displays which form the alphanumeric characters through the generation of such characters in "character boxes" on the display and printers which print on a character by character basis. Most conventional word processing systems with interactive display terminals generally operate the display terminal as a character generation or "character box" display.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Character by Character Display, Shading of Displayed Graphics

The present expedient relates to word processing systems having interactive display terminals, and more particularly to such systems with terminals having "character box displays", i.e., displays which form the alphanumeric characters through the generation of such characters in "character boxes" on the display and printers which print on a character by character basis. Most conventional word processing systems with interactive display terminals generally operate the display terminal as a character generation or "character box" display. In such a display, an encoded representation of each of a font of characters is stored in a character generator memory, and as each character is to appear on the display during each display refresh cycle, the character generator memory is addressed and the coded representation of that particular character is taken from the memory and displayed in a particular designated "character box" on the display. The present expedient relates to a problem involved with assigning independent display shades to the upper and lower halves of a character box used in the formation of a displayed bar chart. Each typical character box on the display is 16 pels (picture elements) high and 8 pels wide. For bar characters, the character box is broken into top and bottom halves each 8 pels by 8 pels. Each of these halves can be one of 4 shades or a blank. This yields the following matrix of shade possibilities.

(Image Omitted)

where the 4 shades in the top or bottom of the character box are:

(Image Omitted)

Each of these 25 bar shade glyphs has been assigned a code point (0-255) decimal or 00-FF hexadecimal in a typical display ROS (read-only store). For example, the first character may be code point X'4C' and the second X'B9'. These code point values are inserted in the character byte of the character- attribute byte pair that exists for each display cell in the memory of the display adapter card.

(Image Omitted)

A problem arises for the horizontal side-by-side and vertical stacked bar charts in assigning independent shades to the top and bottom halves of the character box based on the user's numeric data values. For horizontal side-by-side bars, the bars are abutted to one another and can be as thin as half of a charac...