Browse Prior Art Database

Speech Output Display Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041723D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barnett, CJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes a method of providing blind-user awareness of the device status on a speech-output display terminal. The device in questions is an IBM 3278 display terminal, modified in such a way as to provide spoken output of screen data, aimed at the blind or visually-impaired user. Directives given via a small auxiliary keypad enable the blind user to have read out to him selected lines, words, or characters from the screen, or to have spoken such things as cursor position. However, awareness of device status poses a rather different problem. This is normally conveyed to a sighted user via a status indicator row along the bottom of the screen.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Speech Output Display Terminal

This article describes a method of providing blind-user awareness of the device status on a speech-output display terminal. The device in questions is an IBM 3278 display terminal, modified in such a way as to provide spoken output of screen data, aimed at the blind or visually-impaired user. Directives given via a small auxiliary keypad enable the blind user to have read out to him selected lines, words, or characters from the screen, or to have spoken such things as cursor position. However, awareness of device status poses a rather different problem. This is normally conveyed to a sighted user via a status indicator row along the bottom of the screen. Its format is that of a series of groups of special symbols and pictures - intended to be graphically analogous to the prevailing machine status (and therefore internationally understood). In practice, the sighted user who experiences an unfamiliar symbol or combination, enlists the help of a detailed explanatory booklet (contained within the keyboard for quick reference) showing different symbol combinations and relating them to particular machine status. In this way he perhaps gradually grows familiar with an increasing subset of these symbols. The blind and independent-minded user would have a problem then, if when querying machine status from his keypad, he was barraged with even direct verbal descriptions of each individual symbol. For example, the status row situation shown below would yield: "Four in a box, A underlined, blob, big X, pin man, grid, question mark". The first part of the method is therefore to store, within the device's memory, a table mapping the common combinations of indicator symbols within a group to the actual machine status they are intended to convey - expressed verbally, and to have the device access this automatically, for each group, when the auxiliary "device status query" key is pressed. In this way the indicator situation shown in the figure would generate (o...