Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Signal Cable Wiring That Simplifies Diagnosing Cable Problems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041739D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Parent, PA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Diagnosing line faults in multiconductor cables is facilitated by wiring scheme shown. Fig. 1 shows that line 1 runs from pin all of connector A to pin b2 of connector B, and line 2 crosses to run from a2 to b1. Line pair 7-8 is crossed in like manner, as are the intervening pairs 3-4 and 5-6 (not shown). The advantage in wiring cables this way can be seen by comparing Fig. 1 with Fig. 2 which shows the same cable reversed end for end with respect to devices I and II between which it is connected. Note that the signal lines are still connected correctly, but that they are connected by a different physical path. The fact that a different conductor and connector pins are used for each signal passing through the cable when the cable is reversed can be utilized in diagnosing problems.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 86% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Signal Cable Wiring That Simplifies Diagnosing Cable Problems

Diagnosing line faults in multiconductor cables is facilitated by wiring scheme shown. Fig. 1 shows that line 1 runs from pin all of connector A to pin b2 of connector B, and line 2 crosses to run from a2 to b1. Line pair 7-8 is crossed in like manner, as are the intervening pairs 3-4 and 5-6 (not shown). The advantage in wiring cables this way can be seen by comparing Fig. 1 with Fig. 2 which shows the same cable reversed end for end with respect to devices I and II between which it is connected. Note that the signal lines are still connected correctly, but that they are connected by a different physical path. The fact that a different conductor and connector pins are used for each signal passing through the cable when the cable is reversed can be utilized in diagnosing problems. If a conductor in the cable should be open, it would cause a definite failing symptom in the device I or II, or both, under test. Reversing the cable would cause a different failing symptom. Therefore, if they symptom changes after reversing the cable, the fault is in the cable. If the symptom does not change, the fault is elsewhere. In addition to being useful for identifying open conductors, this scheme can identify short circuits between non-"crossed" conductors. In Fig. 2, a short between Line 1 and Line 7 would be detected when the cable was reversed. Short circuits that will not be detected are those between "crossed" c...