Browse Prior Art Database

Linear Actuation With Rotary Support

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041811D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones, DW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Rotary actuators are generally used in devices requiring a simple, inexpensive and efficient actuator mechanism, and an undesirable compromise results wherein the transducer moves in an arc whose radius is governed by the length of the rotating arm holding the transducer. This nonlinear movement causes undesirable skewing of magnetic heads or other devices, which are susceptible to this misalignment. The figure shows a simple mechanism in which a transducer can move in a substantially radial direction while being supported by a rotating arm that can be either driving or driven. Transducers 3 are mounted on support 4, which in turn is pivoted on flexures 5, 6 and 7. Flexure 5 is attached to rotary arm 8 pivoting at 9. Flexure 7 is grounded. Flexure 6 connects support 4 to link 10.

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Linear Actuation With Rotary Support

Rotary actuators are generally used in devices requiring a simple, inexpensive and efficient actuator mechanism, and an undesirable compromise results wherein the transducer moves in an arc whose radius is governed by the length of the rotating arm holding the transducer. This nonlinear movement causes undesirable skewing of magnetic heads or other devices, which are susceptible to this misalignment. The figure shows a simple mechanism in which a transducer can move in a substantially radial direction while being supported by a rotating arm that can be either driving or driven. Transducers 3 are mounted on support 4, which in turn is pivoted on flexures 5, 6 and 7. Flexure 5 is attached to rotary arm 8 pivoting at 9. Flexure 7 is grounded. Flexure 6 connects support 4 to link 10. An extension of line 13 in the operating range of the device always passes through the centerline of the disk. Therefore, transducers 3 which are concurrent with line 13 are always perpendicular to any given track because each is always on a true radial line from the disk center. Flexures are shown as the support pivot members although any sort of suitable pivot might be employed.

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