Browse Prior Art Database

Self-Instructing Stepping Motors for Automation System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041816D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Begasse, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article relates to a system for reproducing motions, comprising self-instructing motors. Control signals for the stepping motors are generated and stored in a memory during a training phase by using the stepping motor coils as transducers. The stored signals are used during the reproduction phase to control the motors. As shown in Fig. 1, two stepping motors control the displacement of a manipulating arm. During the training phase, the arm is manually displaced following the motion to be reproduced. In each stepping motor, the inductance of each coil varies due to the rotor displacement. Each coil is arranged in an oscillating circuit, as shown in Fig. 2. The inductance variation produces a frequency variation of the oscillating circuit. The frequency variation is converted into a voltage variation through an integrator.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 84% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Self-Instructing Stepping Motors for Automation System

This article relates to a system for reproducing motions, comprising self- instructing motors. Control signals for the stepping motors are generated and stored in a memory during a training phase by using the stepping motor coils as transducers. The stored signals are used during the reproduction phase to control the motors. As shown in Fig. 1, two stepping motors control the displacement of a manipulating arm. During the training phase, the arm is manually displaced following the motion to be reproduced. In each stepping motor, the inductance of each coil varies due to the rotor displacement. Each coil is arranged in an oscillating circuit, as shown in Fig. 2. The inductance variation produces a frequency variation of the oscillating circuit. The frequency variation is converted into a voltage variation through an integrator. The integrator output is provided to a comparator (COMP) to be compared with a threshold voltage. An integrator output higher than the threshold means that the stator is passed in front of a stator tooth. The comparator output is transferred to a latch which applies the control data to random access memory (RAM). A SYNC circuit common to both motors is provided to synchronize the motions of the motors during reproduction. This circuit which received the latch outputs provides the count-up input to address counter (CNT). Upon the occurrence of a signal from one coil, the address counter...