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Browse Prior Art Database

Toner Concentration Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041819D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bustamante, LA: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Toner is automatically added to the developer of a xerographic copier in accordance with a comparison of the light reflected from a toned test patch, and that which is reflected from an untoned test patch, both patches being located in the photoconductor's working image area. The latent electrostatic image of the toned test patch is formed by turning off the copier's document illumination lamp, as one of the two photoconductor image panels passes through the copier's illumination station. The copier's interimage erase lamp, edge erase lamps, and an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are then selectively energized to form an electrostatic image of the to-be-toned test patch on this one photoconductor image area.

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Toner Concentration Control

Toner is automatically added to the developer of a xerographic copier in accordance with a comparison of the light reflected from a toned test patch, and that which is reflected from an untoned test patch, both patches being located in the photoconductor's working image area. The latent electrostatic image of the toned test patch is formed by turning off the copier's document illumination lamp, as one of the two photoconductor image panels passes through the copier's illumination station. The copier's interimage erase lamp, edge erase lamps, and an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are then selectively energized to form an electrostatic image of the to-be-toned test patch on this one photoconductor image area. The document illumination lamp is then turned back on, so that the next image panel can be used for making a copy. In view of the rise time which occurs to full intensity illumination of the original document by the just-turned-on document illumination lamp, the copier's photoconductor charge voltage is momentarily lowered (made less negative), and/or the copier's development electrode voltage, on the magnetic brush developer roll, is momentarily raised (made more negative). In the copier of Fig. 1, two-panel-photoconductor drum 10 is first charged negatively at charge station 11, as the drum rotates in a clockwise direction. Thereafter, the "working area" of each panel of the photoconductor drum is discharged by the reflected image of an original document 13, as the photoconductor passes through imaging station 12. Fig. 2 shows drum 10 in an unrolled state. This drum provides two photoconductor panels A and B, which are separated by metal drum seals 14 and 15. Each photoconductor panel includes a working area 16, about 81/4x11 inches in size. Border areas 17 and interimage areas 18 are never used in making copies. Interimage and end-erase lamps 19 (Figs. 1 and 2) are cycled on and off, as the drum rotates, in order to erase photoconductor areas 17 and 18, prior to a photoconductor panel entering magnetic brush developer 20. Fig. 2 shows panel A having areas 21 and 22, which are, respectively, the areas where a toned test patch and an untoned test patch are located. When it is ne...