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Method of Representing the Beam Intensity Distribution for Workpiece Surfaces Processed by Oscillating Nozzles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041822D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fiedler, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The profile homogeneity of workpiece surfaces treated by oscillating nozzles or of oscillated workpieces treated by fixed nozzles depends in particular on the beam concentration, the beam pressure, the relative speed, the beam stroke, and, if a plurality of nozzles are used, on the nozzle distance. By modifying one or several of these parameters, the beam intensity distribution can be optimized, particularly by changing the beam stroke, so that there are hardly any overlapping stroke cycles. For experimental purposes, using inflexible isotropic material, in particular ceramics, the amount of material removed is nearly proportional to the abrasion produced by the blast of the operating beam. The material best suitable for representing the beam intensity distribution is a mixture of gypsum and water.

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Method of Representing the Beam Intensity Distribution for Workpiece Surfaces Processed by Oscillating Nozzles

The profile homogeneity of workpiece surfaces treated by oscillating nozzles or of oscillated workpieces treated by fixed nozzles depends in particular on the beam concentration, the beam pressure, the relative speed, the beam stroke, and, if a plurality of nozzles are used, on the nozzle distance. By modifying one or several of these parameters, the beam intensity distribution can be optimized, particularly by changing the beam stroke, so that there are hardly any overlapping stroke cycles. For experimental purposes, using inflexible isotropic material, in particular ceramics, the amount of material removed is nearly proportional to the abrasion produced by the blast of the operating beam. The material best suitable for representing the beam intensity distribution is a mixture of gypsum and water.

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