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Expedient for Tracking the Number of Files Converted From Exchange Files to Internal Processor Files

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041833D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Yu, KM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the present-day office information systems environment, the exchange of data between various word processing and data processing systems is routine. When carrying out such a data exchange, it is conventional to convert internal processor files to the various processor s into exchange data files. Then, when the data has been transferred to the destination processor, it is reconverted from an exchange file to internal files suitable for the particular processor involved. This destination processor may be a word processing system which saves these converted records in an internal buffer from which there is "WRITE" into a diskette memory when there is no more room for the next record in the processor buffer.

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Expedient for Tracking the Number of Files Converted From Exchange Files to Internal Processor Files

In the present-day office information systems environment, the exchange of data between various word processing and data processing systems is routine. When carrying out such a data exchange, it is conventional to convert internal processor files to the various processor s into exchange data files. Then, when the data has been transferred to the destination processor, it is reconverted from an exchange file to internal files suitable for the particular processor involved. This destination processor may be a word processing system which saves these converted records in an internal buffer from which there is "WRITE" into a diskette memory when there is no more room for the next record in the processor buffer. Means must be provided for keeping track of the number of records which have already been converted and are in the buffer. Otherwise, when an error occur, there will be no opportunity to backtrack without knowing the number of records in the buffer. The present algorithm solves this backtracking problem problem so that we may determine where the system is when an error occurs. Consider the following problems. When converting an Exchange (EX) file which consists of many exchange data sets on multi-volume to an internal or Report (RP) file, there is a problem with the correct number of records converted being posted on the status frame. RP records are written to diskette by ba...