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Stepper Motor Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000041889D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cavill, BR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article concerns a method for testing stepper motors under dynamic operating conditions. It is particularly effective for determining if stepper motors to be used for positioning paper in printing systems are capable of handling the required loads. The testing configuration is indicated in Fig. 1. The motor 1 is linked through conventional pedestal driver and commutation logic networks 2 and 3 to microprocessor 4 which directs the tests. The output of an attached analog tachometer 5 is buffered at 6, converted to a digital function by analog-to-digital converter 7 and applied to the microprocessor at 8. Under the direction of the microprocessor, the motor is started, propelled through a predetermined displacement at a constant velocity with predetermined phase commutation stimulation, and halted.

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Stepper Motor Tester

This article concerns a method for testing stepper motors under dynamic operating conditions. It is particularly effective for determining if stepper motors to be used for positioning paper in printing systems are capable of handling the required loads. The testing configuration is indicated in Fig. 1. The motor 1 is linked through conventional pedestal driver and commutation logic networks 2 and 3 to microprocessor 4 which directs the tests. The output of an attached analog tachometer 5 is buffered at 6, converted to a digital function by analog-to- digital converter 7 and applied to the microprocessor at 8. Under the direction of the microprocessor, the motor is started, propelled through a predetermined displacement at a constant velocity with predetermined phase commutation stimulation, and halted. When the motion is supposed to have terminated for an ideally operating motor (but in reality may vary due to variations in motor characteristics and capability to follow the ideal velocity profile), the microprocessor samples the input 8 while the motion is damping (see Fig. 2). Using this information, the microprocessor determines the peak velocity and evaluates the "overshoot" characteristics of the motor as an indication of its likelihood that problems will occur in actual operation). Motors having excessive overshoot are rejected (not used). In operation, the microprocessor gives commands to accelerate and decelerate the motor using a pres...